Down the Colorado

I came across the following this morning in the Wall Street Journal:

Iran’s Long Tentacles 
Iranian cyberspies infiltrated the control system of a small dam less than 20 miles from New York City two years ago, sparking concerns that reached to the White House, according to U.S. officials. The still-classified dam intrusion illustrates a top concern for authorities. America’s power grid, factories, pipelines, bridges and dams are largely unprotected on the Internet, and—unlike in a traditional war—it can be difficult to know where or whether an opponent has struck. Meanwhile, the Obama administration, pushing to support international trade with Iran, has advised the country’s rulers not to worry about new U.S. legislation that clamps visa restrictions on people who have traveled to Iran.

Now I do not want to get into a discussion here of what Obama has or hasn’t done, what he should or shouldn’t do.  But in Down the Colorado an Iranian cell destroys Glen Canyon Dam using low tech methods with devestating consequences.  Is it possible?  Would a country like Iran even consider such an objective?  Apparently so.

And it makes for an exciting story,  right out of the newspaper (but which fortunately hasn’t happened yet.)  Down the Colorado by Karen Hopkins is available at Amazon in paperback or ebook.

Read it and let me know how what you think!

Karen

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About Karen Hopkins

Karen Hopkins (1949-) was born in Los Angeles and raised in Martinez, California. At seventeen she moved to Talcahuano, Chile. After completing her university degree she worked in London, England for Pan American Airlines and traveled extensively throughout Europe, the Middle East, and India. For twenty-six years Karen taught Spanish and English as a Second Language in a variety of settings including a private school in Panama, the "most remote school in the United States"--Ticaboo, Utah, the Navajo Reservation, a teacher exchange in Hermosillo, Mexico, Carl Hayden High School in Phoenix, Arizona, and Cochise College in Nogales, Arizona. She and her husband travel extensively throughout Mexico and Central America, and have spent many summers in the remote highlands of Chiapas and Guatemala with their family. Karen currently lives in Southern Arizona, near the Mexican border.
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